Fighting Cancer through healthy eating

Posted by in Organic Digest on February 6, 2018 Comments off

 

According to the Ministry of Health, 35 people are diagnosed with cancer with 15 people dying from cancer on a daily basis between the years 2011 to 2015. With such alarming numbers, it’s no wonder that the Singapore government has poured money into building a new National Cancer Centre to be ready by 2022.

The normal remedies for cancer defer to chemotherapy and drugs, which are debilitating and expensive. As an individual who wants to reduce their risk of contracting cancer or help a loved one suffering from cancer, one ultimately reaches the burning question:

What can one do to fight the risk of cancer on a daily basis?

Avoid the consumption of processed foods which are full of refined sugar, the main energy sources for cancer cell growth. Preservatives in the food can also accumulate over time in the body. This leads to higher toxicity in the body which causes cellular damage to encourage the onset of cancer. Processed meats including sausages and bacon have been classified as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Eating 50 grams of processed meat increases the risk of colon cancer by 18% compared to the normal lifetime risk of 5%.

Consuming more fruits and vegetables is vital in the fight against cancer. Organic fruits and vegetables with their relatively low pesticide residue levels further reduce the risk of foreign toxins poisoning the body. Carrots are powerful cancer-fighting foods due to their high carotenoid levels which also gives them their bright orange colour. Citrus fruits such as oranges, lemons and limes are high in flavonoids which hamper cancer cells growth by depriving them of energy. In addition to cancer-fighting, they also contain plentiful vitamins and minerals essential to boosting the body’s immune system, preventing heart disease and strengthening bones.

Replace your normal white rice with brown rice for more antioxidants content. These antioxidants prevent free radical damage leading to cancer. Brown rice possesses more dietary fibre which when consumed in higher amounts are linked to a lower risk of colon cancer. Salt is regularly added to food during the cooking process for extra flavouring. However, high salt intake has been linked to a higher risk of stomach cancer. It is recommended by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) to consume only about 6 grams of salt per day, so aim to cut down your salt intake by having more home-cooked meals instead of dining out.

There isn’t a single panacea to cure cancer for good. Eating healthily and avoiding non-beneficial foods can go a long way in preventing cancer. The key to doing so is one of discipline and patience.